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Live Healthy Georgia - Seniors Taking Charge
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Be Smoke Free shadow graphic
Get the Facts
Live Healthy Georgia Tip Sheet
Smoking and Older Adults
Practical Tips and Tools
Match Smoking Habits to Quit Methods
Take this short quiz to find the best way for you to quit based on your smoking habits.
Quit Tips from CDC
5 Tips on how to quit
How to Quit CDC Information Resources
What's Your Tobacco Tally?
Tobacco isn't just bad for your health. It can hurt your pocketbook, too. Calculate how much you smoke and how expensive your habit is.
Online Resources
ACS Guide to Quitting Smoking
ACS Stay Away from Tobacco
Kicking Butts - Quit Smoking and Take Charge of Your Health (book)
Available for purchase through Amazon.com (and other retailers)
Second Hand Smoke
When nonsmokers are exposed to secondhand smoke it is called involuntary smoking or passive smoking. Nonsmokers exposed to secondhand smoke absorb nicotine and other compounds just as smokers do. The greater the exposure to secondhand smoke, the greater the level of these harmful compounds in your body.
Make Smoking History
Here you can find information about the MA Smoke-free Workplace Law, support networks and other helpful websites dedicated to smoking cessation to use in combination with medical advice from your physician. You can also find the hard facts about cigarette ingredients and other tobacco products, as well as the lowdown on secondhand smoke. If you really do want to quit and stay quit, use as many of these resources as you need. You're doing something positive for your health, and the health of those around you!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Site last reviewed: October 24, 2012

The content and opinions expressed on this Web page do not necessarily
reflect the views of nor are they endorsed by the University of Georgia
or the University System of Georgia.

Division of Aging ServicesGeorgia.gov Unversity of Georgia